Park update: The Interim Walkway at the Western Rail Yards (between 30th & 34th Streets) is temporarily closed today.

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30th Street Challenge
Give by June 20

To meet the demands of our busiest time of the year, we ask all friends of the High Line to help us raise a total of $30,000—$1,000 for each block of our 1.5-mile-long park along Manhattan’s West Side.

Photo by Julieanne Prevete Photo by Julieanne Prevete

Participatory
Budgeting

Did you know that in many NYC council districts—including the High Line’s District 3—residents can decide how to spend more than $1 million of the city budget? It happens through Participatory Budgeting. Read more about this innovative democratic process, and how you can be part of the decision.

Did you know that in many NYC council districts—including the High Line’s District 3—residents can decide how to spend more than $1 million of the city budget? It happens through Participatory Budgeting. Read more about this innovative democratic process, and how you can be part of the decision.

What is Participatory Budgeting?

Participatory Budgeting, known as “PB,” is a democratic process that gives people the power to decide how to spend tax dollars in their neighborhoods. It started in Brazil in 1989, and has since spread to more than 3,000 cities throughout the globe.

PB came to New York City in 2011, when four council members piloted “PBNYC.” Today, more than 30 council districts across the boroughs participate, each dedicating at least $1 million of public funds. Residents come up with ideas, collaborate on proposals for improvements they want to see in their neighborhoods, and then vote—the winning projects get funded and implemented.

Participatory Budgeting in District 3

Since 2014, Friends of the High Line has partnered with New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson to lead PBNYC efforts in New York City Council District 3, which covers the neighborhoods of Chelsea, Hell’s Kitchen, Greenwich Village, West SoHo, Hudson Square, Times Square, Garment District, Flatiron, and the Upper West Side.

These efforts have largely been led by High Line teen staff, local youth hired through our Youth Participatory Budgeting Committee.

The committee is open to any youth (high- or middle-school students) who are interested in PB and who have a connection to District 3. Members work in partnership with Speaker Johnson’s office to support all aspects of the PB process—from idea generation to get-out-the-vote activism.

In April 2018, the High Line worked with Speaker Johnson’s team and various partners to launch the city’s first ever PB FEST. Held in the Dr. Gertrude Kelly Playground, the festival engaged community members of all ages through arts and culture, gathering together to vote and generate new ideas for our city.

Since 2014, the community has funded projects including:

  • A new public park on 20th St.
  • A new cooling system for the Muhlenberg Public Library
  • New audio and visual equipment for PS 11
  • Bus countdown clocks at five key bus stops
Learn more about winning projects

Get involved

Any resident of District 3, who is at least 11 years old or in 6th grade, can vote in PBNYC—even if you are not a registered voter.

Find your district
Learn more from Speaker Corey Johnson’s Office
Learn more about PBNYC

 

To stay in the loop and receive PB updates, text PBNYC to (212) 676-8384.

 

What happens when?

Kick Off

Kick Off

Participatory Budgeting Kick Off Event hosted by District 3 office.

September

Participatory Budgeting Kick Off Event hosted by District 3 office.

September

Neighborhood
Assemblies

Neighborhood
Assemblies

At public meetings in each district, community members learn about PB and discuss their community’s needs. They then brainstorm project ideas and select budget delegates.

October

At public meetings in each district, community members learn about PB and discuss their community’s needs. They then brainstorm project ideas and select budget delegates.

October

Delegate
Orientations

Delegate
Orientations

Volunteer budget delegates learn about the budget process, project development, and key spending areas, then form committees.

November

Volunteer budget delegates learn about the budget process, project development, and key spending areas, then form committees.

November

Delegate
Meetings

Delegate
Meetings

Delegates meet in committees to transform the community’s initial project ideas into full proposals, with support from council member staff and other experts.

February

Delegates meet in committees to transform the community’s initial project ideas into full proposals, with support from council member staff and other experts.

February

Poster-Making
and Project Expo

Poster-Making
and Project Expo

Delegates work with artists to create science fair-style posters to display projects that will be on the ballot. During the Project Expo in March, those posters are all displayed and community members can vote early on their favorite projects. The community vote in April, as residents vote on which projects to fund at voting sites throughout the district.

March

Delegates work with artists to create science fair-style posters to display projects that will be on the ballot. During the Project Expo in March, those posters are all displayed and community members can vote early on their favorite projects. The community vote in April, as residents vote on which projects to fund at voting sites throughout the district.

March

Winning Projects
Announced

Winning Projects
Announced

Winning projects are announced in May at the West Side Summit, a community event which includes a “State of the District” address of updates on the district’s pressing issues.

May

Winning projects are announced in May at the West Side Summit, a community event which includes a “State of the District” address of updates on the district’s pressing issues.

May

'' PB places power back in the hands of the community and makes people, especially people of color, feel empowered by the decisions they are making in their own communities with real money. '

— Naomi Estevez, Teen Arts & Culture Council Leader
Explore

Volunteers

Throughout our history, dedicated volunteers have helped make the High Line a success.

Teens

We offer paid job opportunities for local youth in arts and social justice, urban gardening and food justice, cultural event production, civic participation, and neighborhood engagement.

Community Parks Initiative

We believe that community-driven green space is one of the most vital elements of city life, and we’re proud to partner with NYC Parks in supporting open space stewardship through the Community Parks Initiative.

Support

High Line Teens is generously supported by Jamie and Jeffrey Harris, Lynne Waxman Foundation – Jessica Davis and Sandy Klein, Merck Family Fund, Sarah Min and Matt Pincus, and The Palette Fund. High Line Teens is supported, in part, with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the New York City Council – with special thanks to Speaker Corey Johnson and the Greener NYC Initiative.

High Line Programs are supported, in part, with public funds from the New York City Council, under the leadership of Speaker Corey Johnson.