Design

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Author: 
jeffatthehighline
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As many Chelsea dwellers, West Side Highway & Hudson River Park commuters, taxi drivers, and car wash enthusiasts may have noticed, the distinctive red Chelsea Car Wash sign has disappeared. It was removed from where it was attached to the High Line about a month ago with little fanfare.

In the coming months, the Car Wash-- one of the characteristic staples of the working West Side--will close its garage doors to make way for a new retail location on the corner of West 14th Street and 10th Avenue.


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There's currently no tenant booked, but in the next year or so, the Milk Group (as in Milk Studios, next door), aims to find a design, fashion, or other retail tenant for this 40,000-square-foot space directly underneath the High Line. Renderings from their sales office show wrap-around windows in Car Wash-like glass. There's also apparently a subterranean level for more retail.

More design renderings, and facts about the neighborhood-- from the sales brochure--after the jump.


Author: 
Patrick Hazari
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One of the most exciting furniture pieces on the High Line will be movable chaise lounge chairs located at the Sundeck between West 14th and 15th Streets. These lounge chairs will sit on the original rail tracks, mounted on new wooden ties, and can be rolled into place or set with brakes.

Unobstructed views of the Hudson River will make this one of the most desirable areas to visit on the High Line. 

This mock-up arrived last week and is installed near the Gansevoort end.

More photos after the jump.

Author: 
robertatthehighline
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This remains my favorite proposal for the reuse of the High Line - a mile long lap pool. Nathalie Rinne, an architecture student in Vienna submitted the plan and as part of our 2003 Ideas Competition.

Author: 
Anonymous
 

Yesterday, James Corner from Field Operations (the landscape architecture firm heading up the High Line's design team) revealed plans for the firm's newest commission: Shelby Farms Park in Memphis, the 4,500-acre site that will be America's largest urban park. (Central Park, by comparison, is 843 acres.)

Author: 
Danya Sherman
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Searching for a downtown alternative to the Armory show this weekend? Look no further than Pier 40, which will house the PULSE Contemporary Art Fair, exhibiting works in all media from over 70 international galleries.

Author: 
Anonymous
Gay Kepple from Millane Nursery, tagging the tented Hamamelis Pallida
for a planting area on the High Line
  Sierra Bainbridge and Maura Rockcastle at Field Operations, the landscape architecture firm leading the High Line design team, have been travelling to plant nurseries around the east coast in search of native plants for the High Line. Planting is projected to begin this spring. Sierra explains what the trips are all about:

"We're scouring native plant nurseries throughout the region, searching for many of the native trees and shrubs proposed for the High Line.  Some of the native material we have found is a little smaller than planned, which only means it will have more time to naturalize and grow into its new environment."

Our first tagging trip was on February 28, to the north fork of Long Island. There we tagged the first tree for the High Line, the Koelreuteria paniculata (Goldenrain tree) for the area around the stair entrance to the High Line at 14th street. Because the planting beds have very shallow depths, we are planting lots of smaller trees and shrubs so that they will fit and acclimatize to the conditions on the High Line as they grow. We measured a few pre-dug Koelreuteria rootballs to ensure they would fit into the shallow depths of their planting bed, but we ended up choosing trees that are still in the field. We saw a lot of other great plants that day, but we went only for the lovely Koelreuteria."

Sierra, left, tagging the first tree for the High Line, with
Annette Wilkus from SiteWorks, the planting contract manager
 
Tagging the Koelreuteria paniculata
 
Measuring the rootballs
 
Author: 
Anonymous
 
Another addition to the burgeoning architectural wonderland that is West Chelsea.

Author: 
Danya Sherman
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On Tuesday night we had our first membership event: a lecture with the High Line's planting designer, Piet Oudolf. You may have seen Piet's beautiful work in the gardens at Battery Park City, Millennium Park in Chicago, or at other sites elsewhere around the world.

Piet discussed his theory of planting design, which he describes as "inspired by nature". He then took us through the planting design plan for the High Line. The planting beds will vary based on the landscape design; some areas will be planted to feel more like a meadow, some a prairie, some woodland, and so on. This variation is based on the different microclimates that developed naturally on the High Line after trains stopped running on it. Piet also uses perennials that require less maintenance, and will look good throughout all four seasons.


'Brown is also a color': Planting Design Piet Oudolf Accepts Death

Another one of Piet's presentations is on our Web site.

Photos from Tuesday's presentation are after the jump.


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