Photo of the Week

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Gigi AltarejosDried grasses, bare branches, and a light blanket of snow epitomize winter beauty in the High Line’s gardens. Photo by Gigi Altarejos

It may only be the end of January, but many New Yorkers are already looking for signs that the icy grip of winter is loosening. While some in the nation will be celebrating the beginning of Chinese New Year and rooting for their favorite teams, others of us will be watching attentively as Punxsutawney Phil, the country’s most famous weather-prognosticating groundhog, makes his prediction about the coming of spring.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Mike TschappatHigh Line Photographer Mike Tschappat captured an interesting view of the High Line with visitors and Chelsea Piers in the background, silhouetted against a warm end-of-the-day sky.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Timothy SchenckOur newest High Line Billboard, Shelf Still Life by Jonas Wood, photographed by Timothy Schenck

High Line Photographer Timothy Schenck perfectly captured our latest High Line Billboard, Shelf Still Life by Jonas Wood in an aerial image, allowing us to see how this monumental work of art appears at a distance. The lofty viewpoint showcases the scale of the billboard in relation to the High Line, as well as how the work's bright colors interact with the muted shades of the winter landscape. Schenck has taken photographs of High Line Art's projects for years, and his documentation of the program's sculptures, billboards, and other works of art allows us to appreciate them in a whole new way.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Vadim KrisyanPhotographer Vadim Krisyan captures the High Line beautifully in black and white. A limited palate highlights Ulla von Brandenburg’s Shadowplay on view daily beginning at 4:00 PM on High Line Channel 14 located in the 14th Street Passage on the High Line.

In this age of highly saturated, full-color imagery, it is refreshing to see the timeless, muted tones of a monochrome image. The starkness of winter lends itself to shades of gray. By using black-and-white, Vadim Krisyan focuses his viewers on shape, light, and subject. Undistracted by color, the eye can take in a scene in a wholly different way. This is especially appropriate when looking at an image of von Brandenburg’s video installation, Shadowplay.

See more of Krisyan’s images of the High Line here, all poetically simplified by the use of a black-and-white lens.

View more of the beautiful work of other visitors and High Line Photographers – and share your own – in the High Line Flickr Pool.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photos by Juan Valentin The seed heads of plants past their prime are beautiful in their winter state. The High Line’s perennials are intentionally left by our gardeners to overwinter naturally, and won’t be cut back until spring. Photos by Juan Valentin

The landscape design of the High Line is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took over during the decades after the last train rumbled by in 1980. Planting designer Piet Oudolf’s design concept for the High Line selects shrubs, trees, flowers, and grasses for their four-season interest, color, and texture. This time of year, you’ll notice an important aspect of Piet’s four-season vision: stiff stalks, architectural seed heads, and dried grasses create beauty and interest in the winter garden.

In these three elegant images High Line Photographer Juan Valentin singled out beautiful examples of plants that have gone to seed and photographed them portrait-style. From left to right, smooth sumac, Rhus glabra, swamp rose mallow, Hibiscus moscheutos ssp. palustris, and Hydrangea paniculata 'Limelight,' have lost their bold hues but are striking in their winter incarnations.

Winter hours on the High Line are 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM, but stay tuned to @highlinenyc on Twitter during inclement weather for updates.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photos by Oliver RichThe High Line’s operations staff work hard to keep the park’s paths clear of snow so visitors can enjoy the magical scenery that comes with winter snowfall. Photos by Oliver Rich

It’s a busy time of year for our operations staff – custodians, rangers, maintenance crew, and gardeners all chip in to help clear snow and ice as quickly as possible so the park can open to the public following winter storms. The result is a wintertime treat for visitors willing to brave the elements: the natural beauty of our winter gardens is augmented by snowfall. Snow catches in dried seed-heads, ice clusters cling to grasses, and High Line Art installations are dusted with a light powder of snowflakes.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Christine Wehrmeier On a beautiful – but no doubt chilly – winter night last year photographer Christine Wehrmeier captured the elegance of different light sources against the deep blue of the night sky.

The sun is setting early these days, making most of us want to curl up and hibernate, but rest assured that there are still great reasons to brave the elements and head outside. In addition to being a magical time to be out and about in New York City, the High Line offers its own seasonal after-dark light show, which can be especially impressive during the winter months when the vegetation is less abundant. In this image taken by photographer Christine Wehrmeier, the majesty of the Empire State Building is enhanced by its blue lights framed by the soft lights of the park's railings and planting beds in the lower half of the frame. The few illuminated windows in the neighboring building are storytelling elements as well.

SEE MORE of Christine's winter High Line photos.

Bundle up and stroll the High Line this month; our winter hours are 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM. Plan your next visit.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photographer UnknownIn the late 1800s and early 1900s, the Gansevoort Farmers’ Market was one of the area’s primary sources for fresh produce. This image circa 1907 shows a birds-eye view of the hundreds of vendors gathered at the marketplace between Gansevoort and Washington Streets, decades before the High Line was built. Photographer unknown.

‘Tis the season to eat! Friends and family gather to celebrate around delicious meals this time of year. Will you do your holiday food shopping at New York City favorites like Fairway, the Union Square Greenmarket, or Sahadi’s? In the early 20th century, shoppers flocked to open-air markets like the bustling Gansevoort Farmers’ Market, pictured above, to do their grocery shopping. Every morning six days a week, the Gansevoort Farmers’ Market would fill with horse-drawn carts heaped with vegetables trucked in from primarily Long Island and New Jersey. Business would be brisk as home shoppers, grocers, and restaurateurs scoured the market for the freshest goods of the day.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Eddie CrimminsThe air is chilly but the bright sun calls people to the High Line. Photo by Eddie Crimmins

The summer season is behind us, but don’t fear the cold! While brisk and windy at times, recent weather has been comfortable for leisurely walks along the High Line. These past few weeks, visitors have enjoyed the warm colors of fall foliage and the changing landscape of the park’s plantings, now dominated with architectural seed heads and dried stems instead of bright blooms.

One of the High Line’s most beloved features, the 10th Avenue Square, is still a popular place to soak up the sun, relax, or share a bite to eat. High Line Photographer Eddie Crimmins caught this lovely moment earlier in the month.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Chris ChristianLego enthusiast and photographer Chris Christian snapped this image of a Lego model he created as part of his 2013 “A Lego a Day” project.

The subject of this Photo of the Week caught our eye because of its playful and creative interpretation of one of the park’s iconic design features.

Photographer and Lego enthusiast Chris Christian created this Lilliputian version of one of the rolling lounge chairs from the High Line’s Diller – von Furstenberg Sundeck. During a recent visit to New York earlier this season, he snapped this photo of his creation side-by-side with the real thing. This particular model was the 249th in his 2013 “A Lego a Day” project.

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