The High Line Blog

  • Plant of the week echinacea coneflower list image

    Plant of the Week: Echinacea Coneflower

    Photo by Steven Severinghaus The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen fo... read more
  • Photo of the week common crossings at 24th street list image

    Photo of the Week: Common Crossings at 24th Street

    Photo by Phil Vachon The High Line takes on a different personality in the colder months of the year. In this beautiful photo by High Line Photographer Phil Vachon, the golden tones of Korean feather reed grass complement the rusty hues of Marianne Vitale’s High Line Commission, Co... read more
  • Plant of the week visions in pink astilbe list image

    Plant of the Week: Visions in Pink Astilbe

    Photo by Friends of the High LineThe High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for... read more
  • Santina opens at the high line list image

    Santina Opens at the High Line

    Photo by Liz Ligon Friends of the High Line and High Line Food are thrilled to announce the opening of the High Line’s first sit-down restaurant, Santina. Located under the High Line at Gansevoort and Washington Streets, Santina is the newest addition to the High Line’s food ... read more
  • Photo of the week evening primrose list image

    Photo of the Week: Evening Primrose

    Photo by Steven SeveringhausIt’s hard to believe that the High Line at the Rail Yards opened just a few short months ago. It has been exciting to watch the transition of the seasons roll through for the first time, from summer to fall, and now to winter and our first snowfall.One of my favorite p... read more
  • Plant of the week midwinter fire bloodtwig dogwood list image

    Plant of the Week: Midwinter Fire Bloodtwig Dogwood

    Photo by Joan Garvin The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their ... read more
  • Participate in 2015 spring cutback list image

    Participate in Spring Cutback

    Photo by Liz Ligon In keeping with planting designer Piet Oudolf’s vision, High Line plants are not trimmed back at the onset of cold weather as they are in most gardens. Instead, the textured grasses, skeletal plant stalks, and dried seed heads define the High Line’s winter landscap... read more
  • Plant of the week korean tassel fern list image

    Plant of the Week: Korean Tassel Fern

    Photo by Friends of the High LineThe High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for... read more
  • Plant of the week gibralter bushclover list image

    Plant of the Week: Gibralter Bushclover

    Photo by Friends of the High LineThe High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for... read more
  • Photo essay under the high line list image

    Photo Essay: Under the High Line

    All photos by Mike TschappatAs a staff member of Friends of the High Line, I feel like I’m often focused solely on what’s going on in the park: plants, food, visitors, public programs, etc. But the most exciting and interesting feature of the structure itself is arguably its elevated nature. This... read more