Photo of the Week

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Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photos by Juan Valentin The seed heads of plants past their prime are beautiful in their winter state. The High Line’s perennials are intentionally left by our gardeners to overwinter naturally, and won’t be cut back until spring. Photos by Juan Valentin

The landscape design of the High Line is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took over during the decades after the last train rumbled by in 1980. Planting designer Piet Oudolf’s design concept for the High Line selects shrubs, trees, flowers, and grasses for their four-season interest, color, and texture. This time of year, you’ll notice an important aspect of Piet’s four-season vision: stiff stalks, architectural seed heads, and dried grasses create beauty and interest in the winter garden.

In these three elegant images High Line Photographer Juan Valentin singled out beautiful examples of plants that have gone to seed and photographed them portrait-style. From left to right, smooth sumac, Rhus glabra, swamp rose mallow, Hibiscus moscheutos ssp. palustris, and Hydrangea paniculata 'Limelight,' have lost their bold hues but are striking in their winter incarnations.

Winter hours on the High Line are 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM, but stay tuned to @highlinenyc on Twitter during inclement weather for updates.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photos by Oliver RichThe High Line’s operations staff work hard to keep the park’s paths clear of snow so visitors can enjoy the magical scenery that comes with winter snowfall. Photos by Oliver Rich

It’s a busy time of year for our operations staff – custodians, rangers, maintenance crew, and gardeners all chip in to help clear snow and ice as quickly as possible so the park can open to the public following winter storms. The result is a wintertime treat for visitors willing to brave the elements: the natural beauty of our winter gardens is augmented by snowfall. Snow catches in dried seed-heads, ice clusters cling to grasses, and High Line Art installations are dusted with a light powder of snowflakes.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Christine Wehrmeier On a beautiful – but no doubt chilly – winter night last year photographer Christine Wehrmeier captured the elegance of different light sources against the deep blue of the night sky.

The sun is setting early these days, making most of us want to curl up and hibernate, but rest assured that there are still great reasons to brave the elements and head outside. In addition to being a magical time to be out and about in New York City, the High Line offers its own seasonal after-dark light show, which can be especially impressive during the winter months when the vegetation is less abundant. In this image taken by photographer Christine Wehrmeier, the majesty of the Empire State Building is enhanced by its blue lights framed by the soft lights of the park's railings and planting beds in the lower half of the frame. The few illuminated windows in the neighboring building are storytelling elements as well.

SEE MORE of Christine's winter High Line photos.

Bundle up and stroll the High Line this month; our winter hours are 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM. Plan your next visit.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photographer UnknownIn the late 1800s and early 1900s, the Gansevoort Farmers’ Market was one of the area’s primary sources for fresh produce. This image circa 1907 shows a birds-eye view of the hundreds of vendors gathered at the marketplace between Gansevoort and Washington Streets, decades before the High Line was built. Photographer unknown.

‘Tis the season to eat! Friends and family gather to celebrate around delicious meals this time of year. Will you do your holiday food shopping at New York City favorites like Fairway, the Union Square Greenmarket, or Sahadi’s? In the early 20th century, shoppers flocked to open-air markets like the bustling Gansevoort Farmers’ Market, pictured above, to do their grocery shopping. Every morning six days a week, the Gansevoort Farmers’ Market would fill with horse-drawn carts heaped with vegetables trucked in from primarily Long Island and New Jersey. Business would be brisk as home shoppers, grocers, and restaurateurs scoured the market for the freshest goods of the day.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Eddie CrimminsThe air is chilly but the bright sun calls people to the High Line. Photo by Eddie Crimmins

The summer season is behind us, but don’t fear the cold! While brisk and windy at times, recent weather has been comfortable for leisurely walks along the High Line. These past few weeks, visitors have enjoyed the warm colors of fall foliage and the changing landscape of the park’s plantings, now dominated with architectural seed heads and dried stems instead of bright blooms.

One of the High Line’s most beloved features, the 10th Avenue Square, is still a popular place to soak up the sun, relax, or share a bite to eat. High Line Photographer Eddie Crimmins caught this lovely moment earlier in the month.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Chris ChristianLego enthusiast and photographer Chris Christian snapped this image of a Lego model he created as part of his 2013 “A Lego a Day” project.

The subject of this Photo of the Week caught our eye because of its playful and creative interpretation of one of the park’s iconic design features.

Photographer and Lego enthusiast Chris Christian created this Lilliputian version of one of the rolling lounge chairs from the High Line’s Diller – von Furstenberg Sundeck. During a recent visit to New York earlier this season, he snapped this photo of his creation side-by-side with the real thing. This particular model was the 249th in his 2013 “A Lego a Day” project.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This image from earlier this season shows the exposed steel framework of the High Line at the Rail Yards. Since then, this area, known as the Spur, has been filled in with a new concrete decking. New design renderings for this space will be unveiled during a program this upcoming Monday. Photo by Timothy Schenck

It is an exciting moment in the construction timeline for the High Line at the Rail Yards. The first phase of the rail yards is taking shape and this upcoming Monday, November 11, designs will be unveiled for the Spur, pictured above, a section of the High Line at the Rail Yards that extends over 10th Avenue at West 30th Street.

For this week’s Photo of the Week we’re featuring two of our recent favorites of the Spur from photographer Timothy Schenck who has been expertly documenting the progress of construction at the High Line since before our first section was underway in the spring of 2006.

Read more after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Two visitors enjoy a morning stroll despite the rain. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Photographer Timothy Schenck captured this vibrant autumn photo this morning as a light rain fell on the Chelsea neighborhood. Peering out from between the trees in the 10th Avenue Square, on the High Line at West 17th Street, Tim’s photo captures a north-facing view of the park’s fall foliage and our newest High Line Billboard at West 18th Street.

Contrasting with the overcast day, Thomas Demand’s new High Line Billboard installation, High Line, offers an unwavering bright patch of blue sky next to the park. This seemingly simple poetic image of an empty clothesline is actually a photograph of a meticulously constructed paper and cardboard replica of these everyday objects.

The large billboard format, which High Line Art Curator & Director Cecilia Alemani has used to augment the presence and impact of artworks, creates an interesting interaction with park goers and sparks the imagination. Clotheslines are both familiar and exotic – in the sense that they are recognizable, but don’t quite fit into our 21st-century city-dwelling existence. (Maybe a more Manhattan-centric version could involve quarter slots or a drop-off laundry reference?)

However you choose to interpret and enjoy the new High Line Billboard, it’s not a bad thing to be reminded of a summer breeze on an idyllic countryside, especially on rainy days like today. Stop by soon – this High Line Billboard will be on view until Monday, December 2, 2013.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Mike TschappatAutumn has begun to turn the leaves of the Brownies hairy alumroot, Heuchera villosa 'Brownies.' Photo by Mike Tschappat

High Line Photographer Mike Tschappat took this wonderfully moody image of a deep red-brown Brownies hairy alumroot during a recent early morning photo walk. Fall has arrived on the High Line and the vibrant reds, oranges, and yellows are wonderful to see. The crisp air and brilliant sun should stay with us through the weekend.

On Saturday, enjoy the foliage and stay for some Halloween fun. From 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM, we'll be hosting our fourth-annual Haunted High Line Halloween, featuring a variety of spooky activities throughout the park.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Transplanting tassel ferns on the High LineHigh Line Gardener Orrin Sheehan and Volunteer Lebasi Lashley work along the Philip A. and Lisa Maria Falcone Flyover. Photos by Friends of the High Line

Approximately 360 species of perennial plants flourish on the High Line and are cared for by a team of dedicated High Line Gardeners and volunteers.

Most of this planting activity on the High Line takes place in the spring and fall. Last week, High Line Gardener Orrin Sheehan transplanted tassel ferns, Polystichum polyblepharum, taking them from dry spots and relocating them to more heavily watered areas. On this particular day, he and High Line Volunteer Lebasi Lashley also planted a few wild ginger, Asarum canadense, and barrenwort, Epimedium grandiflorum, plants along the same beds beneath the Falcone Flyover.

Volunteers work alongside High Line Gardeners throughout the year to keep the High Line beautiful. We are so thankful for all of our volunteers and their enormous efforts.

For more information about what is growing on the High Line, plan your visit and take along our October Bloom List.

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