Art

highlighted mobile

Art

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Raymond Pettibon, No Title (Safe he called...), 2013. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York / London.
 

You only have a few more days to see artist Raymond Pettibon’s High Line Billboard No Title (Safe he called…), on view next to the High Line at West 18th Street and 10th Avenue. A work from his famous series of baseball drawings, Pettibon’s piece depicts the movements and dynamism of a game between the Boston Red Sox and the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Thomas Houseago's Lying Figure among the High Line's original rail tracks. Photo by Austin Kennedy.

The time has come to bid farewell to Thomas Houseago’s HIGH LINE COMMISSION Lying Figure, installed on the High Line at Little West 12th Street. Lying Figure is a 15-foot-long bronze sculpture of a headless giant, leaning on its elbows between the High Line’s original rail tracks.

Follow the jump to read more.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
El Anatsui in front of his HIGH LINE COMMISSION Broken Bridge II. Photo by Austin Kennedy.

This past fall Art21 stopped by the High Line to film the installation of El Anatsui’s HIGH LINE COMMISSION Broken Bridge II, located on a wall adjacent to the High Line between West 21st and West 22nd Streets.

Follow us after the jump to watch the video.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
 

In celebration of Richard Artschwager’s blp installation, High Line Art, the Whitney Museum, and The Standard, New York, invite you to participate in the collective documentation of the project.

Follow us after the jump to learn more about the contest!

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Visitors enjoy Jennifer West's screening of One Mile Film. Photo by Liz Ligon.
 

Last week we debuted Jennifer West’s new feature-length video during a special outdoor screening at the High Line. If you missed the video, you can now view a short clip online. Follow us after the jump to learn more and watch.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Categories: 
Photo by Dan Nguyen.
 

Since the first section opened to the public in 2009, the High Line has inspired many in the West Chelsea community to install murals, sculptures, and other works of art around the High Line. We are often asked if these projects are part of High Line Art, and although they are not part of our curated program, they are popular attractions for visitors to the High Line, and add to the vibrant art community that surrounds the park. Here are some highlights from this summer season:

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Elad Lassry, Women (065, 055), 2012. Part of HIGH LINE BILLBOARD. Installation view, Edison Properties, West 18th Street at 10th Avenue, New York. On view August 1 – September 7, 2012. Photo: Austin Kennedy. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line..
 

Wednesday morning we braved the rain to install the latest artwork on HIGH LINE BILLBOARD, our High Line Art series of installations on the 25-by-75 foot billboard next to the High Line at West 18th Street and 10th Avenue.

It’s a new work by Los Angeles-based artist Elad Lassry titled Women (065, 055). The work features two young women, both dressed alike, gazing out of two small portholes into a sea of green. Detached from any visual history or context, the image is both mesmerizing and elusive. It highlights the very act of observing and being observed and allows visitors to create their own conceptual space and visual context for the image.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle

On May 31st the corner of West 18th Street and 10th Avenue received a colorful new addition to the Edison Properties billboard. Untitled is the latest edition on HIGH LINE BILLBOARD, a series of commissions by High Line Art for the large billboard next to the park at West 18th Street. It was installed by acclaimed Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan and photographer Pierpaolo Ferrari, the artists behind the photography magazine Toilet Paper.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Categories: 


Later this week, we will unveil Kim Beck’s Space Available, a series of rooftop sculptures along the High Line. In this new video, Kim gives us a special preview, and discusses her process and inspiration for the work.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
pipeCarol Levitt's second grade class at the Village Community School used the High Line to study a number of topics this past spring. One element was this structure, which the class constructed as a model of the structure in its current use as a public park.
 

The High Line is more than place for strolling and enjoying city views—the park's gardens, design, and history are excellent tools for teaching people of all ages. This is especially true for Carol Levitt, a 2nd grade teacher at the Village Community School in the West Village.

Carol saw the High Line as a means of teaching her students about the life-cycle of plants, our city's industrial history, and the importance of community participation. After bringing her students on fields trips with Emily Pinkowitz, our School & Youth Program Manager, Carol's students asked to build a giant model of the High Line in their classroom. Using building blocks, cardboard, construction paper, aluminum foil, plastic, and other found materials, they created a model that takes a look at what the High Line once was, and what it is today.

The students' careful attention to detail shines through in their final result. The model included architectural design features, like the 10th Avenue Square, and prominent neighborhood landmarks near the park, like The Standard Hotel and Pastis. It even featured a garden that used live plants, pebbles, and popsicle-stick railroad tracks to recreate the way the High Line looked when the trains stopped running.

"The children in my group feel as if the High Line somehow belongs to them," Carol says, "They joyfully take their parents, grandparents, and friends of all ages to the High Line and tell them the story. The children followed the approval of the Rail Yards with cheers. How extraordinary that they studied the High Line as it grew and will continue to grow. They see themselves as being the future of the High Line—which they will indeed be."

The photos tell the full story. Follow us after the jump for a tour of their project.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Art