High Line Art

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Author: 
Christian Barclay
Josh Kline's Skittles part of the High Line Art group exhibition, Archeo. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Josh Kline’s Skittles, part of the group exhibition Archeo, is an industrial refrigerator containing smoothies produced by the artist using unconventional and poetic combinations of ingredients, including kale chips, squid ink, sneakers, phone bills, and pepper spray. Each smoothie stands as a portrait of a different contemporary lifestyle. When grouped together, they evoke a landscape of aspiration, taste, and – at times – deprivation in a metropolis like New York City.

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Photo by @aloarowa

There are very few (good) reasons to awake at 5:30 AM, but the promise of a picturesque sunrise and room to roam brought out a snap-happy group of Instagrammers to the park on Wednesday, July 23. We joined with Instagram to welcome a small group to visit the park before it opened and document their adventures. The event, #emptyhighline, produced dozens of beautiful shots that captured the park in an early morning glow.

Check out some of our favorites below, and follow @highlinenyc and @highlineartnyc for more beautiful photos of the park.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Timothy SchenckIsabelle Cornaro's artwork stands amid a canopy of trees and cheery hedgenettle. Photo by Timothy Schenck

The presence of High Line Art’s group exhibition Archeo changes with the seasons. In summer, as lush foliage reaches up, encircles, and even obscures parts of the artworks, the visitor’s experience is almost that of a treasure hunt. Rather than seeing an artwork from a block away, sometimes a pause or slower walking pace is necessary to notice a piece peeking out from the back of a planting bed.

The three sculptures of God Box (column) by French artist Isabelle Cornaro – one of which is pictured here – are both alien and familiar, and both at home and foreign within the High Line’s landscape. One can imagine they are monuments of a futuristic society or that they were dropped here by visitors from another planet. After all, that was High Line Art Curator Cecilia Alemani’s intention.

“On the High Line – where freight trains used to run 30 feet above the street, in a landscape worthy of the futuristic machinations of a science fiction movie – the sculptures presented in Archeo punctuate the landscape in unusual ways, creating a gallery of artifacts from a futuristic past,” Cecilia said at Archeo’s installation earlier this spring.

Download the current High Line Art Map to learn more about all of High Line Art’s current artworks on view.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckAn installation view of Carol Bove's High Line Commission Caterpillar installed on the High Line at the Rail Yards in 2013. Photo by Timothy Schenck.

Friends of the High Line founded High Line Art in 2009 with the opening of the first section of the High Line. The mission of High Line Art is to present a wide array of artwork including site-specific commissions, exhibitions, performances, video programs, and a series of billboard interventions. We invite artists to think of creative ways to engage with the uniqueness of the architecture, history, and design of the High Line and to foster a productive dialogue with the surrounding neighborhood and urban landscape. Since 2011, High Line Art has been curated by Cecilia Alemani. Previously, the program was curated by Lauren Ross.

Since 2009, High Line Art has worked with over 120 artists from around the world, including up-and-coming artists as well as mid-career and established artists. We have presented more than 22 commissions; 21 videos on High Line Channels 14 and 22; 18 billboards; and 14 performances.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckPhoto by Timothy Schenck
 

There are only a few days left to see artist’s Faith Ringgold’s fun and colorful High Line Billboard, Groovin High, next to the High Line at West 18th Street.

Faith Ringgold is a painter, writer, speaker, mixed media sculptor, and performance artist working in Englewood, New Jersey. Since the early 1960s, Ringgold has been known since for her story quilts, politically charged paintings and prints, and illustrated children’s books. She has eloquently articulated a critical perspective on American identity through the lenses of the feminist and civil rights movements. Her boldly colorful geometric compositions point to influences from early American and European Modernism, dhakas – richly brocaded Tibetan paintings – and African masks. Her choice of the quilt as her primary medium in later years reflects a fundamental connection to practicality and her ancestors' feminine crafts.

For the High Line, Ringgold revisited her colorful and paradigmatic story quilt Groovin High (1986), one of the many story quilts Ringgold created that inspired a revival of the medium in the late 1970s. Depicting a crowded dance hall bordered by quilted hand-dyed fabrics, Groovin High is evocative of Ringgold’s memories of Sunday afternoon dances at the Savoy and her connection to the African American communities of her native Harlem. Her style reflects formal treatments of shape, color, and perspective reminiscent of many painters whose styles defined the Harlem Renaissance, an immensely productive and creative cultural movement of the 1920s that erupted out of the African American community living in the eponymous New York neighborhood.

Groovin High will be on view through June 2 and is located within the Edison ParkFast parking lot next to the High Line at West 18th Street and 10th Avenue.

You can also visit Ringgold’s mosaic Flying Home: Harlem Heroes and Heroines (Downtown and Uptown) at the 125th Street 2/ 3 subway station.

See more photographs of Groovin High below.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckEd Ruscha’s High Line Commission Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic Today is the artist’s first public art commission in New York City. All photos by Timothy Schenck.
 

Cecilia Alemani, the Donald R. Mullen Jr. Curator & Director of High Line Art talks about legendary artist Ed Ruscha’s first public commission in New York City.

Can you tell us about Ed Ruscha’s commission for the High Line, which opened in early May?
It is the first time that Ed Ruscha is presenting his work in a public space in New York City. The project consists of a large-scale mural painted on the side of an apartment building overlooking the High Line at West 22nd Street. The mural recites “Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic Today,” and it is a reinterpretation of a 1977 pastel drawing of the same title. The mural is quite large, measuring 30 x 50 feet.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Timothy SchenckJessica Jackson Hutchins’ sculpture Him and Me is turning heads on the Falcone Flyover, on the High Line between West 25th and West 26th Streets. Photo by Timothy Schenck

High Line Art’s third group exhibition kicked off this week with the installation of eight artworks by seven national and international artists. Titled Archeo, this exhibition explores humanity’s alternating fascination and frustration with technology. From the rusty industrial (reminiscent of the once-derelict High Line) Common Crossings by Marianne Vitale to the hauntingly contemporary and semi-familiar Skittles by Josh Kline, each work transforms the ordinary visitor into an archeologist, uncovering human-made “artifacts” of post-industrial society.

This week’s Photo of the Week by photographer Timothy Schenck captures Jessica Jackson Hutchins’ organic and personal-feeling artwork, lovingly entitled Him and Me. This ceramic sculpture takes respite in a hand-woven hammock beneath the High Line’s Falcone Flyover, between West 25th and West 27th Streets.

Learn more about all of the artworks of Archeo.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckAn installation view of Marianne Vitale's Common Crossings, part of the group exhibition Archeo. Photo by Timothy Schenck

High Line Art will premiere several new projects this spring as part of its ever-changing public art program, including the outdoor group exhibition Archeo, a new billboard by Faith Ringgold, and a large-scale mural by legendary artist Ed Ruscha.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Categories: 
Photo by Timothy SchenckWhether semi- or fully nude, Pan delighted visitors from all over the world during his time on the High Line. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Pan, a mischievous-looking satyr, has been charming visitors from his perch at Gansevoort Street for nearly a year. Created by artist Sean Landers, the sculpture is part of Busted, a High Line Art group exhibition.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Steven SeveringhausSteven Claydon’s sculpture, UNLIMITEDS & LIMITERS, is obscured by the dried grasses of the High Line’s winter landscape. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

From the lifelike Human Statue (Jessie) to the humorous Nose Job to the perplexing Number One (from the series Heroes on the Run), the temporary High Line Art installation Busted brought together an engaging and surprising collection of sculptures by ten local and international artists. Drawing its inspiration from the dedicatory monuments of ancient Rome, this playful collection of sculptures toys with the tradition of urban landmarks in unexpected ways.

It’s difficult to believe that Busted’s tenure is coming to a close. Over the past year, to the delight of visitors and staff members alike, the landscape has grown up around the Busted artworks and changed over the seasons. Even the surfaces and the personalities of the artworks have transmuted over the months of sunshine, rain, and snow. No matter what season, Busted is a great reminder of the unique experience of a four-season “sculpture garden” that the High Line offers.

Stop by before the beginning of April to see Busted one last time. Don't despair its departure though, we also have a new group exhibition to look forward to this spring: Archeo.

Follow @highlineartnyc on Instagram for more photos of Busted.

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