High Line Blog

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Author: 
Amelia Krales
EnlargePhoto of Friends of the High Line

In this week’s Photo of the Week, two High Line Horticulture Interns Sarah Ruiz (left) and Raquel Rosado (right) pose proudly with High Line Horticulture Educator Gahl Shottan (center) next to an edible garden they helped plant and tend at Public School 33. We’ve chosen to feature this photo to celebrate these two teens and the important contributions they’ve made to the High Line’s horticulture and the surrounding community over the two months of their internship, which just came to a close.

Sarah and Raquel graduated from the High Line’s Green Corps program in July and continued on as Horticulture Interns, working side-by-side with the park’s gardeners to help care for our plants through the rest of the summer. This season marked the second year of Green Corps – which exposes teen participants to aspects of environmental science, gardening, and what it means to work in the horticulture field – and the first season of Horticultural Internships. This new internship position uses the skills and knowledge the teens had gained in the Green Corps program as a springboard for more in-depth learning and hands-on experience.

See more photos and learn more after the jump.

Author: 
Programming Staff
Categories: 
Photo by Liz LigonTwo of our teen participants, Junemarie Gonzalez and Dajours Schoonmaker, showcase looks from designer Synderela. Photo by Liz Ligon

This August, Friends of the High Line hosted its first official public runway event – a back-to-school fashion show that was the culmination of months of work by a group of local teens. We recruited the talented teens to work with designers and create looks for our August 29 event. This select group of young fashionistas not only met with professional designers and pulled looks from their existing collections, they also designed two original pieces for Tabii Just and LaQuan Smith. Additionally, the teens were responsible for casting the models and choosing the accessories, hairstyles, and makeup that completed each look.

Keep reading for a closer look at the action.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto of the High Line by Iwan Baan

In celebration of our new 18-month High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

Photographer Barry Munger captured this dreamy shot of the High Line at the Rail Yards in the summer of 2007, nearly two years before the first section of the park would open to the public. Barry has been a longtime supporter and friend of the park, often focusing his keen eye and old-school film cameras on a variety of High Line subjects.

In 2007, when this photo was taken, construction was underway on the first two sections of the High Line from Gansevoort to West 30th Streets. Section 1 of the park, running from Gansevoort to West 20th Streets, would open to the public nearly two years later, and Section 2 would open a year after that. Yet, in 2007, there was still uncertainty surrounding the High Line at the Rail Yards. It wasn’t clear whether the full vision of the High Line could be realized and this last half-mile stretch saved and transformed into public space. It would be over five years before the future of this final piece of the High Line would be secured.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Gilbert & George, Waking. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

The High Line Art Billboard is back in action, sporting Gilbert & George’s Waking (1984) next to the High Line at West 18th Street. With luminous colors and thick black outlined figures, the semi-mirrored composition of faces and bodies recalls the look of a stained glass window. Gilbert & George stand confidently in the center of the billboard, with their hands clasped in front of them, surrounded by mask-like faces and a line-up of young men. Taken together with the title, the scene suggests a sort of inner awakening in the passage from boyhood to manhood supported by the inclusion of various age groups.

Read more after the break.

Author: 
Adam Dooling
Photo of copper iris by Steven SeveringhausThe vibrant copper iris continues to bloom late into the season. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
A honeybee on pink flower buds Can you spot the honeybee at work in this photo? Photographer Steven Severinghaus has a knack for capturing beautiful images of plants and insects on the High Line.

The High Line’s late summer and early fall landscape is full of delicate and beautiful textures.

In Steven Severinghaus' mesmerizing macro shot, a honeybee disappears into the complex pattern made by the tiny pink buds of stonecrop, Sedum ‘Matrona.’ Stonecrop and many other hot weather blooms will be around just a little while longer before they are replaced by the textured grasses and brilliantly colored leaves that characterize the fall season.

The High Line is open 7:00 AM to 11:00 PM through September, so seize the opportunity to visit the park for an event, an evening stroll, or some delicious treats from our High Line Food vendors while the weather is still warm.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A City MomentThe delicate blooms of pink-flowered indigo spring up from the planting beds at West 16th Street. Take a moment's pause during your next visit so you don't miss them!

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Wild spurge Photo by Rowa Lee

Fall is on its way, and with the change of leaves comes a new recipe inspired by autumn’s bounty. This month, we’re presenting Terroir at The Porch’s Seasonal Farro Salad with sugar snap peas, carrots, onions, and farro. Dress this delicious salad with olive oil, red wine vinegar, and a touch of salt. The flavor of this salad pairs perfectly with a roasted butternut squash soup or vegetarian chili.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
A City MomentOn the southeast corner of West 17th Street and Tenth Avenue, visitors can enjoy an elevated view from the High Line's 10th Avenue Square. Photo by Eddie Crimmins

With a population topping eight million people, there are eight million daily journeys winding their way through the city at the same time. If you have a moment to people-watch, it's fun to observe how these different lives intersect on the streets and in the public spaces of New York City. High Line Photographer Eddie Crimmins has a keen eye for these moments and shared this image with us.

Suspended above a busy avenue, the High Line’s 10th Avenue Square is a unique design that allows visitors a bird’s-eye view of the hustle and bustle on the street below. Amphitheater-style seating was cut into the High Line’s original steel structure, lowering visitors beneath the level of the railway’s original track bed. Wide windows punctuated with steel beams invite viewers to sit and observe the streets below. It is the ultimate location for quiet observation of city life – a fascinating story unfolding in real time.

For more information about the park’s innovative design, pick up a copy of our book Designing the High Line: Gansevoort to West 30th Street.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Wild spurge Photo by Rowa Lee

On the High Line, our food vendors are always rotating their menus inspired by the changing seasons. Celebrate the final days of summer with The Taco Truck’s Fresh Tomatillo Salsa recipe, which will add a hint of acid and spice to your late summer meals. This delicious salad contains serrano chiles, a handful of fresh cilantro, garlic, a touch of salt, and plenty of tomatillos. This dish pairs beautifully with any grilled fish or as a burger topping.

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