High Line Blog

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Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Dig in: Pizza with sausage, peppers, mozzarella, and tomato at The Standard Plaza. Photo by Joan Garvin
 

Although we’re (overly?) fond of the luscious tacos and ice-cream sandwiches our food vendors offer on the High Line, we do occasionally supplement our diets with delectable food prepared by our neighbors. When our friends at The Standard Plaza tempted us with words like “pizza” and “tequila,” we knew we had to schedule a lunch at the open-air restaurant at West 13th and Washington Streets. To keep the memories as fresh as the creamy burrata, we filmed the whole thing.

The next time you’re in the mood for rosé sangria and gourmet pizza, stop by The Standard Plaza, at The Standard, High Line, at 848 Washington Street. Keep reading for a mouthwatering account of our visit.

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”It’s 6 o’clock somewhere!” The Dolores has spiced tequila and sumac salt for kick. Pimm’s, grapefruit, cucumber and mint mingle beautifully in the Copa Inglesa.
















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Rich, buttery burrata tops warm bread—the table let out an “Ooooh” when this bad boy arrived. The roasted cauliflower and asparagus appetizers behind the burrata were less sinful but just as flavorful.
















Author: 
Madeline Berg
Hula Dancer pale purple coneflower The Hula Dancer pale purple coneflower blooms on the High Line at 15th Street and between 27th and 28th Streets.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photos by Friends of the High LineA composite of two photographs shows a happy L’Arte del Gelato customer on the left and a Melt ice cream sandwich on the right. Both are perfect antidotes to this summer heat! Come get yours on the High Line today. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

Hot enough for ya? The sun is strong, so bring your sunscreen to enjoy the breeze and shade on the High Line. If you like to sunbathe, relax on one of our deck chairs or snag a spot on the 23rd Street Lawn. Either way, get through this heat wave with a visit to the High Line and cool off with an icy treat from one of our High Line Food vendors!

Stop by L’Arte del Gelato on the High Line at West 15th Street to taste this week’s special flavor, peach sorbet. If you need a couple of cookies to go with that ice cream, Melt—on the High Line at Little West 12th Street—has a strawberry ice cream with pastis-crackle cookie sandwich (called “Ethereal,” pictured above) that hits the spot. Over at Peoples Pops, the shaved ice is a sure thing to cool you down, and La New Yorkina’s icy treats never disappoint. For a cool beverage pick up an ice coffee at Blue Bottle Coffee or starting July 1, try one of Brooklyn Soda Works’ delicious carbonated home-made juice offerings in flavors like apple ginger.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
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From meeting one of President Obama’s daughters to shaving a two foot-long block of ice that draws huge crowds of curious customers, Darren Fiorello of People’s Pops has had many adventures serving sweets on the High Line. Meet Darren in our latest installment of Faces Behind the Food. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Raymond Pettibon, No Title (Safe he called...), 2013. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York / London.
 

You only have a few more days to see artist Raymond Pettibon’s High Line Billboard No Title (Safe he called…), on view next to the High Line at West 18th Street and 10th Avenue. A work from his famous series of baseball drawings, Pettibon’s piece depicts the movements and dynamism of a game between the Boston Red Sox and the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
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From tasteful nudes to tasty (risotto) balls, there are many different ways to celebrate Pride Week on the High Line.

Due to large crowds anticipated in Chelsea for NYC Pride festivities, the New York City Police Department and the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation ask us to close early the day of the parade—at 6:00 PM on Sunday, June 30. Until then, however, we invite you to try out special Pride Week dishes at our food vendors. And if you don’t feel like spending any cash, it’s always free to sit on the steps at 10th Avenue Square and watch the fabulously diverse crowd strut their stuff.

Rainbow Salad with Sausage & Balls at Terroir

In celebration of Pride Week, our open-air café at West 15th Street will be serving a “Loud and Proud Rainbow Salad.” Available through June 30, the colorful salad consists of mixed baby lettuce, radish, carrot, golden beets, snap peas, red onion, and lemon vinaigrette. Terroir is also getting a little saucier with a “Sausage and Balls” special for the weekend, so be sure to leave room for this dish of house-made sage leaf lamb sausage with beet and Gorgonzola risotto balls.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
To mark the first day of summer, we’re sharing one of our favorite early summer blooms, Astilbe Chinensis 'Visions in Pink,' one of the many plant species thriving on the High Line this season. Photo by Steven Severinghaus
 

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
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Francesco Realmuto, owner of L’arte del Gelato, talks about his knack for cooking the particularly tricky eggplant, beloved in Sicily, and his favorite employee memory of a couple who left their home country to create a new life here in New York City. Meet Francesco in our latest installment of Faces Behind the Food. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Mexican feather grassMexican feather grass is flourishing on the High Line after days of spring rain.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Nominees clockwise from left: Dorothy Parker, Peter Obletz, Magda Sawon, Daniel Reddan, and Florent Morellet. Photo of Peter Obletz by Peter Richards, photo of Dorothy Parker by unknown photographer.
 

As part of Busted, High Line Art’s latest group exhibition, we will be commissioning and producing a new work of art chosen by you—the public—for our #GetBusted contest.

You nominated a lot of great people for the first part of our contest. It was difficult task, but we were able to whittle the list down to five incredible nominees. You can vote for your favorite nominee once a day through 5:00 p.m. ET on Monday, July 1.

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