High Line Blog

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Author: 
Amelia Krales
One of the High Line’s many “peel-up” benches basks in the summer sun against a backdrop of Full Moon Tickseed, Walker's Low Persian catmint, and Siberian catmint. Photo by Eddie Crimmins
 

Given the rainy streak New Yorkers have endured in the past few weeks, it’s hard to believe that the official beginning of summer is just around the corner.

As a reminder of the warmer days ahead, this week’s Photo of the Week by photographer Eddie Crimmins captures a quiet summer moment on the High Line. This west-facing bench at West 24th Street invites visitors to take respite from the city’s hustle and bustle, and soak in the sun with a friend or a good book.

The warm days to come are also bringing back many iconic High Line events! Join us for a taste of summer with a wide variety of programs that are free and open to all ages.

Stargaze with the Amateur Astronomers Association, dance to some live Latin music by Orlando Marin, the Last Mambo King, or take a walking tour of the park – all happening this next week! On Friday, June 21, the evening of the summer solstice, sit amongst the greenery on the High Line at Little West 12th Street to experience Crickets, a High Line Art performance piece by artist Mungo Thompson, inspired by the melodies of nature’s tiniest musicians.

Learn more about these and other events.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney

Although we’re partial to green (and brown), we think the High Line looks fabulous in pink. Diane von Furstenberg created a rose-colored map of the High Line, which includes tips and the designer’s top spots, in celebration of her new Accessories Shop at 440 West 14th Street. You can pick up a copy of the map at our High Line Shop and our Information Station, both located in the Chelsea Market Passage at West 16th Street.

A PDF is also available for download here.



Author: 
Erika Harvey
In June, the High Line’s various grasses thicken turning the park’s planting beds into a verdant backdrop for the showy blooms of foxtail lilies. Photo by Juan Valentin
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
A nighttime view from West 23rd Street, looking north toward Hudson Yards, where Coach will be an anchor tenant in a new tower under construction at West 30th Street and 10th Avenue. Photo by Iwan Baan
 

We are pleased to share exciting news: Coach has made a $5 million gift to the Campaign for the High Line, a fundraising effort to open the High Line at the Rail Yards and build an endowment to sustain the park’s long-term maintenance and operations. This generous gift, made by Coach’s philanthropic foundation, marks a major step toward opening the entire elevated railway to visitors and sustaining the park for future generations to enjoy.

The company will be the anchor tenant in a Hudson Yards tower that will straddle the High Line at the Rail Yards, resulting in a new semi-enclosed passageway that will be the High Line’s largest covered area when the park opens in 2014. In recognition of Coach’s essential contribution to the High Line and the neighborhood it has served for over 70 years, this passageway will be named the “Coach Passage.”

View the press release, or read about it in The New York Times

When you read about inspiring acts of generosity like this one from Coach, it is easy to assume that your own gift may no longer be needed. But please don't forget: We still depend on all of our friends and supporters to maintain and operate the High Line.

Coach’s extraordinary gift will support the expansion of the High Line and help ensure its security for the future, but the day-to-day operations of the park continue to depend on the sustaining support of our neighbors and friends.

As part of our agreement with the City of New York, each year we raise the essential private funding to support 90% of the High Line's operating budget. Custodians, gardeners, educators, mechanics, rangers, technicians—every person you see in the park in a High Line uniform is employed by Friends of the High Line. The City of New York provides for security and utility services, while the rest of the park’s operations budget, as well as the entirety of its administrative budget, are supported by donations secured by Friends of the High Line.

That means when you give to Friends of the High Line, you are helping us make sure that this special public space is always maintained and operated at the high standards we have come to love. We thank all of our members and supporters for their vision in building the High Line, their wisdom in securing its stability for the future, and their ongoing generosity in sustaining it today.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
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Twice a year, a curious cosmic phenomenon brings photographers to the streets of New York City in droves. Manhattanhenge, as it is fondly called, is an event in which the setting sun aligns with Manhattan’s east-west street grid, causing the setting sun to be viewable down the center line of major streets, even from the far eastern side of the island.

High Line Photographer Mike Tschappat captured this lovely sunset scene during the first occurrence of Manhattanhenge this year, which took place last week. The High Line is a great place to watch the sun set on any evening, but on this special evening, the sun magically sinks down the buildings lining the street, before dipping down below the horizon of New Jersey.

This year the second occurrence of Manhattanhenge falls on July 13, although July 12 will also offer good viewing opportunities. To appreciate the phenomenon fully, grab your camera and head to the eastern end of major cross streets in Manhattan, like 14th Street, 23rd Street, 34th Street, 42nd Street, or 57th Street to capture your own photos.



Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Johnny, our Manager of Horticulture, demonstrates proper penmanship for his son Ansel using our HL Logo Notebook + Pen Set. “Awwwwwww,” said everyone in the High Line office.
 

For Father’s Day, we invited a few of the dads at Friends of the High Line to test out our bestselling High Line merchandise—and the photographs have melted the hearts of everyone in the office. You can find these items at the High Line Shop at 16th Street or in our web shop, but for online purchases please order by Sunday, June 9, to receive your items by Father’s Day.

Prepare yourselves, because these photos are very adorable.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
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The Taco Truck may be best known for its addictive pollo asado tortas, but we’d like to introduce you to the person preparing these popular dishes. Meet Trevor St. Pierre, manager of The Taco Truck, in our latest installment of Faces Behind the Food. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

I've always loved cooking, especially for other people or whenever someone comes to visit. I'm the one who wakes up early to cook breakfast for everyone else! I cook all the classics: eggs, bacon, hash browns. Sometimes I make a traditional Trinidadian-style salt fish.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Popping up from the High Line’s planting beds are the deep red blooms of Mars Midget pincushion plant. This long bloomer will be on-view through the fall. Photo by Beverly Israely
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Carol Bove's sculpture, Prudence, contrasts with the lush green spring foliage and hard architectural elements of the High Line at the Rail Yards. Photo by Steven Severinghaus
 

The 2013 season of High Line Art includes a variety of new commissions, including contemporary takes on urban monuments, the longest video ever made, and a fascinating installation of sculptures by artist Carol Bove, entitled Caterpillar, in the third and final section of the High Line at the Rail Yards.

Public walks kicked off in mid-May and will continue for a year, allowing visitors to view the fascinating sculptures of Caterpillar scattered amongst the self-seeded landscape of the High Line at the Rail Yards. This magical photo of one of Bove's pieces, Prudence, was captured by High Line Photographer Steven Severinghaus during an early evening walk after a thunderstorm, when the vegetation was at its greenest.

SEE MORE PHOTOS of Carol Bove's installation at the High Line at the Rail Yards.

If you would like to see Caterpillar, we will begin taking reservations for tickets on Tuesday, June 18, at 4:00 PM. Tickets will be available for walks taking place between Thursday, August 8, and Saturday, September 28. Learn more about this last opportunity to explore the High Line at the Rail Yards before it is turned into public parkland.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
“Growing up, unlike most families who plan the day around attractions in the area, mine planned the day around where we were going to eat,” says Amanda Meister of Sigmund’s Pretzels.
 

Whether she’s discussing what makes the best pretzel or how to build the best boat, Amanda Meister, manager of Sigmund’s Pretzels, brings a sense of joy to her work. Meet Amanda in our second installment of Faces Behind the Food. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

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I stumbled upon Sigmund’s Pretzels a year ago at a local beer festival where I tasted what was the most amazing pretzel of my life. A couple months later, I joined the company. I am a total foodie and couldn’t turn down the offer to work this great business. Growing up, unlike most families who plan the day around attractions in the area, mine planned the day around where we were going to eat. We penciled in other activities in-between meals. I love good food! I also have a love of sailing, which is why I like our location on the High Line that overlooks the river.

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