High Line Blog

highlighted mobile

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
As the city's population grew, congestion caused by a mix of pedestrians, motorized traffic, and street-level freight trains slowed food delivery into New York City. Photo courtesy of the Kalmbach Publishing Company
 

This special blog post, the first in a two-part series (see part two), was written by Sonya Kharas of the NYU Food Studies Program and Nutshell Projects.

Last fall, Friends of the High Line announced plans to open a year-round, full-service restaurant directly below the elevated railway’s southern terminus, at Gansevoort and Washington Streets. The restaurant, to be operated by the team behind Torrisi Italian Specialties and Parm, will serve breakfast, lunch, dinner, and, as it turns out, provide a perfect starting point to consider the historic role that the High Line has played in feeding New York City.

A Historic Marketplace

Decades ago, the site of the High Line’s forthcoming restaurant was home to one of the city’s most important municipal markets: the open-air Farmers’ Market, later Gansevoort Market, for regional produce. Established in 1879, the market was devoted almost entirely to the sale of fruits and vegetables, the majority of which arrived by horse-drawn wagon from nearby farms in Long Island, Staten Island, New Jersey, and Westchester.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Work continues on High Line Headquarters and the future location of the Whitney Museum of American Art as lush spring foliage pops up along the southern end of the High Line. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Crews are busy installing the interior finishes to High Line Headquarters, a four-story building located next to the new downtown location of the Whitney Museum of American Art, which is also under construction.

Designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners, High Line Headquarters will serve as a critical gathering space for visitors, with a new elevator, public restrooms, and a public meeting room when it opens later this year.

The building will also help keep the High Line’s landscape thriving, by giving gardeners, custodians, and maintenance technicians direct access between storage facilities and the park. This will streamline the transfer of materials, vehicles, and equipment -- one of the current challenges of maintaining a park elevated 30 feet above the street.

Stay up to date on the construction of High Line Headquarters by signing up the High Line E-News.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Staff Members Wearing DVF High Line Items(Left) Wrapped in DVF’s High Line Scarf, High Line Community Engagement Manager Erycka Montoya Pérez takes in the cityscape. (Right) Executive Projects Manager AV Goodsell uses DVF’s High Line Tote to carry her items around NYC. Photos by Liz Ligon

This Mother’s Day, give mom something she’ll love and support the High Line with the Diane von Furstenberg limited-edition High Line collection. Designed exclusively for Friends of the High Line, these sleek accessories and supplies are available only on the High Line and at our web shop. With prices ranging from $10 to $85, you can swathe your mom in DVF without breaking the bank.

Decorated with a bright-green heart motif, our DVF High Line Tote is chic and roomy—perfect for a trip to the farmer’s market. And because it’s made of high-quality coated canvas, this carry-all will continue to look new long after May 12. Present it to mom with some goodies inside, like our cute DVF notebooks and magnets.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Sweet Leaf Tea on the High LineFind your #SweetActs on Friday, May 17, with Sweet Leaf® Tea at the Chelsea Market Passage.

Give someone a seat on the subway. Send a friend a handwritten note. Start an urban garden.

Stop by the High Line to plan your sweet act for the day. Take part in an interactive installation presented by Sweet Leaf® Tea, and enjoy free drinks and goodies as you take in the views from the High Line.

Follow us after the jump for details.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This native sedge displays subtle fluffy blooms this time of year

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Enlarge

This week we bid farewell to talented High Line Photographer David Wilkinson, who is moving back to London.

Over the past few seasons, David has worked with Friends of the High Line to capture stunning images of the park’s plants, artworks, and visitors. You may remember a recent Photo of the Week featuring David’s cheery photograph of spring crocus emerging.

See more of David’s photos of the High Line and New York City.

David will be greatly missed, but we look forward to seeing him turn his lens to subjects across the pond.







Author: 
Erika Harvey
The flowers of Whitespire gray birch come in the form of “catkins,” long cylindrical compound flowers that bloom in the spring.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
#GetBusted ContestYou can nominate and vote for a person who you would like to see commemorated in a sculpture on the High Line.

How would you like to see a sculpture of your favorite person grace the High Line?

For thousands of years, people have been erecting monuments of public figures in parks. Isn’t it time that you had a say in who was up there?

As part of Busted, High Line Art’s group exhibition of ten sculptures, we will be commissioning and producing a new work of art chosen by you—the public.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
High Line staffer Sarah enjoys a treat from High Line Food vendor La Newyorkina. Photo by Jenna Saraco

Today we celebrated the mouth-watering reopening of High Line Food!

It’s exciting to see returning and new vendors’ carts bustling with activity as delicious tacos, BBQ, gelato, popsicles, pretzels, and more are served up to hungry visitors. You may even catch some Friends of the High Line staff frequenting their lunchtime—and “ice-cream sandwich break”-time—favorites.

Plan your next lunch break on the High Line, and stop by between Little West 12th and West 16th Streets to discover our new lineup. Tweet your experience or share photos of High Line Food on Instagram by tagging @highlinenyc and #shareameal.

Read more about the 2013 High Line Food vendors.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Frank Benson, Human Statue (Jessie), 2011. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Spring has sprung and with it, new sculptures are sprouting up and down the High Line. Today is the first day High Line Art’s newest HIGH LINE COMMISSION, Busted, a thoughtful and often humorous group exhibition addressing the very nature of public art and monument.

Learn more about Busted after the jump.

Pages