High Line Blog

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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Pick up a copy from one of the stands along 10th Avenue, or follow us after the jump to read the article. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

Last month we introduced you to Erycka Montoya Perez, our new Community Engagement Manager at Friends of the High Line. One of our favorite local newspapers, Chelsea Now, recently spoke with Erycka about her experience thus far and her plans for the High Line.

Follow us after the jump to read the article, watch a short video, and see photos from recent community engagement activities.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist


As you can see in this video by Arbuckle Industries, the third and final section of the High Line at the Rail Yards is currently overgrown with self-seeded wildflowers and grasses that grew up between the tracks when the trains stopped running on the elevated railway in the 1980s.

Our goal has always been to open this final section of the elevated railway as public open space, and last week we held a ceremonial groundbreaking to mark the beginning of construction. Before the work officially begins next month, we’re opening the gates for you to explore the rail yards section during the first two weekends in October. Presented by Uniqlo as part of the 10th Annual openhousenewyork Weekend, the self-guided walking tours during Rail Yards Weekends will be your last chance to walk along the High Line at the Rail Yards before it is transformed into an extension of the High Line park.

Registration opens tomorrow. Follow us after the jump to get registration details.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This beautiful ornamental grass blooms in late summer with feathery pink-tinted panicles that fade to a cream color in the colder months of the year.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Visitors enjoy a glass of Riesling and snacks at Terroir at The Porch as the sun sets. Photo by Nicole Franzen
 

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
During a ceremonial moment to mark the start of construction, we tossed grass and wildflower seeds onto the High Line at the Rail Yards. Some of the seeds were originally collected from the High Line before construction began on the first section of the park back in 2006. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Earlier today we celebrated an incredible moment in the history of the High Line.

We joined a small group of elected officials, supporters, and friends for a ceremonial groundbreaking on the third and final section of the High Line at the Rail Yards.

Follow us after the jump to see photos, design renderings, and learn more.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Showy goldenrod gets its common name from its prolific yellow blooms which are a favorite of fall pollinators.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Artist Jennifer West with her filmstrip One Mile Parkour Film. Photo by Liz Ligon
 

On Thursday, September 13th High Line Art presented One Mile Parkour Film, a day-long performance by Los Angeles-based artist Jennifer West, in which the artist and High Line staff adhered a one-mile-long filmstrip to the entire length of the High Line for one day. Visitors were invited to walk on, touch, draw, dance, and alter the filmstrip, which consisted of images filmed by West in June of locations on and around the High Line.

Check out our slideshow of images of visitors throughout the day leaving their mark on the filmstrip in a variety of fun and inventive ways.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Visitors enjoy an evening walk along the High Line after a day of rain. Photo by Derek Wolter
 

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Join us this October for a special opportunity to explore the final section of the High Line, thanks to support from UNIQLO.
 

Mark your calendars!

The High Line’s final section at the rail yards is currently closed to visitors, but we will be opening the gates for you to explore the site during the first two weekends in October. It’s part of the 10th Annual openhousenewyork Weekend, and this year, thanks to UNIQLO, there will be two weekends of tours, and twice as many opportunities to explore the High Line at the rail yards.

Follow us after the jump to get details.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Honey Day at the High Line featured educational activities, honey tastings, and honey products for sale, all in celebration of the industrious honey bee. Photos (clockwise from right) by Liz Ligon, Jenna Saraco, and Melissa Mansur.
 

Friends of the High Line partnered with Brooklyn Grange Farm to bring in beekeepers from the five boroughs for the first-ever Honey Day at the High Line.

Yesterday, a full afternoon of activities included an extra-special Play With Your Food session with La Newyorkina, an educational beehive, special Honey Day-themed treats from High Line Food vendors, and honey tastings from beekeepers from the five boroughs.

Join us after the jump for more photos from the event.

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