High Line Blog

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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Erycka Montoya Pérez. Photo by Liz Ligon
 

We are pleased to introduce you to Erycka Montoya Pérez, who recently joined our team as the Community Engagement Manager, a new position created to focus on community-based initiatives, with support from the Nathan Cummings Foundation.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe is moving on to The Trust for Public Land. Photo by Tom Kletecka
 

This week Adrian Benepe, the commissioner of the NYC Department of Parks & Recreation, leaves his post to join The Trust for Public Land.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Prairie dropseed is a native grass, known for the distinct scent produced by its seed heads in the late summer. Photo by Cristina Macaya
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Evenings offer an opportunity to experience the park and the surrounding cityscape in a unique way. Photo by Liz Ligon
 

Author: 
AV Goodsell
Kyle Mena, who came to Friends of the High Line from the NYC Ladders for Leaders program, has spent the summer learning about the many facets of our organization. Photo by Liz Ligon
 

This week we bid farewell to Kyle Mena, our invaluable summer intern from NYC Ladders for Leaders. Kyle joined our team in July, and since then has helped complete countless tasks and projects, and provided invaluable support to our organization.

Follow us after the jump to learn more about Kyle and NYC Ladders for Leaders.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
The vines of Major Wheeler coral honeysuckle climb up the vegetal screen between West 17th and West 18th Streets. Stop by this week to enjoy its bright red blooms. Photo by Patrick Cullina
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A visitor relaxes with her summer reading on a High Line bench at West 24th Street. Photo by Navid Baraty
 

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Categories: 
Photo by Dan Nguyen.
 

Since the first section opened to the public in 2009, the High Line has inspired many in the West Chelsea community to install murals, sculptures, and other works of art around the High Line. We are often asked if these projects are part of High Line Art, and although they are not part of our curated program, they are popular attractions for visitors to the High Line, and add to the vibrant art community that surrounds the park. Here are some highlights from this summer season:

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Beverly Israely’s photos celebrate the delicate textures and small details of the High Line. Photo by Beverly Israely
 

The High Line is a great place to take photographs. Whether you’re a horticulture enthusiast focusing on blooms, an architecture fan capturing the cityscape, or an art-lover photographing the art on and around the High Line – there’s a little something for everyone. The light, the views, the people, and the unique landscape offer a wide variety of opportunities for amateur and professional photographers alike.

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Beverly Israely is a long-time resident of the West Village and High Line Member, and she was also one of the High Line’s first visitors after it opened as a public park. “I’ve lived here since 1996, and I had heard all about the efforts to save the structure and make it into a park,” Beverly recalls. “Our family came up on a rainy morning in June, not long after the High Line opened, and I was so inspired by how the space had been transformed. Since then, the park has become one of my family’s favorite neighborhood places. You’ll find us here often – walking, picnicking, relaxing on the lounge chairs, and attending performances and kids' events. We are so happy to share this treasure and support Friends of the High Line and the many members of our community who are dedicated to sustaining the High Line as a special place for New Yorkers.”

Join us after a jump for a glimpse at some of Beverly’s favorite parts of the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Northern blazing star is in bloom between West 27th and West 30th Streets in the Wildflower Field.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

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