High Line Blog

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Author: 
Andi Pettis
Photo by Phil VachonSassafras albidum's clusters of chartreuse flowers add bright color along the High Line. Photo by Phil Vachon

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by John SuharIn the evening hours and on overcast days, Lady Jane tulips, Tulipa Lady Jane, are closed. On warm sunny days the pink petals open to reveal bright white interiors and black anthers. Photo by John Suhar

Yesterday evening, High Line Photographers gathered for the first time in 2014. Pausing briefly to observe beautiful blooms and catch up with old (and new) friends, we worked our way through the park documenting the season. This stunning photo of a “sleeping” Lady Jane tulip by John Suhar epitomizes the nascent magic of spring, which can often go unnoticed. All around the park – and the city – green growth is finally filling in what was once bare soil and tree branches are bursting with new blooms.

Lady Jane tulips, Tulipa Lady Jane, are one of our most iconic spring blooms. Their arrival was a little delayed by cold weather, but now that they’re here, they won’t disappoint. Stop by on a sunny day in the next couple of weeks to see them in full glory.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Photo by Steven SeveringhausCinnamon-colored tassels edge the fronds of the Korean tassel fern as they first begin to unfurl in the spring. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Timothy SchenckJessica Jackson Hutchins’ sculpture Him and Me is turning heads on the Falcone Flyover, on the High Line between West 25th and West 26th Streets. Photo by Timothy Schenck

High Line Art’s third group exhibition kicked off this week with the installation of eight artworks by seven national and international artists. Titled Archeo, this exhibition explores humanity’s alternating fascination and frustration with technology. From the rusty industrial (reminiscent of the once-derelict High Line) Common Crossings by Marianne Vitale to the hauntingly contemporary and semi-familiar Skittles by Josh Kline, each work transforms the ordinary visitor into an archeologist, uncovering human-made “artifacts” of post-industrial society.

This week’s Photo of the Week by photographer Timothy Schenck captures Jessica Jackson Hutchins’ organic and personal-feeling artwork, lovingly entitled Him and Me. This ceramic sculpture takes respite in a hand-woven hammock beneath the High Line’s Falcone Flyover, between West 25th and West 27th Streets.

Learn more about all of the artworks of Archeo.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Timothy Schenck"Head to the ground" is a compliment in gardening, indicating a serious commitment to work. Maeve demonstrates the pose in this candid shot as she tends to the 23rd Street Lawn. Photo by Timothy Schenck

This week we say farewell to Senior Gardener Maeve Turner. After nearly five years at Friends of the High Line, Maeve is leaving our organization to become the Curator of the Herb Garden at Brooklyn Botanic Gardens. She describes the new role as her "other dream job," and we're thrilled that she's moving on to such an incredible position.

But we're so sad to see her go. Maeve began working at the High Line in June of 2009, just one week after the park first opened to the public, and her footprint on our gardens is indelible. Although it would be impossible to sum up Maeve's time here in one mere blog post – not to mention her achievements – we've shared a few highlights and cherished memories below.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckAn installation view of Marianne Vitale's Common Crossings, part of the group exhibition Archeo. Photo by Timothy Schenck

High Line Art will premiere several new projects this spring as part of its ever-changing public art program, including the outdoor group exhibition Archeo, a new billboard by Faith Ringgold, and a large-scale mural by legendary artist Ed Ruscha.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Photo by Friends of the High LineUnlike modern tulip hybrids and cultivars, the flowers of species tulip (Tulipa turkestanica) open entirely in full sun. Photo by Friends of the High Line.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargeIn this photo from 2011, two visitors are perfectly outlined by the High Line’s illuminated frame at West 26th Street. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Extended spring hours mean more time to experience after-dark hours on the High Line. With the park now open until 10:00 PM – and temperatures in a much more friendly range – visitors can enjoy the light show that makes the “city that never sleeps” so enchanting.

The High Line’s position on Manhattan’s far west side makes it the perfect place to watch the evening’s slow transition from day to night. Bright skies warm to darker orange and red hues as the sun dips below New Jersey’s skyline across the Hudson River. The best seats in the house can be found on the Diller – von Furstenberg Sundeck, on the High Line between West 14th and West 15th Streets, and at West 18th Street. Cross streets, like this gorgeous view of West 26th Street captured by photographer Timothy Schenck, also offer a unique opportunity to see the park silhouetted against the colorful evening sky.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Photo by Phil VachonAn early spring bloom, winter aconite is an important source of food for foraging pollinators. Photo by Phil Vachon

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Liz LigonNew York City Department of Parks and Recreation Borough Commissioner Bill Castro shears a tall patch of grass to cheers from Executive Director Jenny Gersten, Borough President Gale Brewer, and volunteers. The Borough Commissioner and Borough President stopped by on Wednesday to mark the official end of this year's Spring Cutback. Photo by Liz Ligon

We've reached the official end of Spring Cutback 2014! After four weeks of hard work by staff and volunteers, this massive horticultural endeavor is complete.

We were concerned about the lasting effects of this frigid and tenacious winter on the High Line's landscape. However, there is at least one advantage of a tardy spring. "Delays in spring weather mean that we can witness the bulbs break ground," said Senior Gardener Maeve Turner. Unlike previous years, when new growth would lie hidden beneath the yet-to-be-cut dried grasses and shrubs, this spring's belated blooms will emerge in our neatly trimmed beds.

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