High Line Blog

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Author: 
Anonymous
  New (and for some, suggestively shaped) concrete bollards are being installed on Ninth Avenue between Little West 12th and West 13th Street, as part of an ongoing new measure to calm traffic and make the streets of the Meatpacking District friendlier to pedestrians. The intersection has long been a kind of car-and-pedestrian free-for-all.

 
Author: 
Anonymous
 

Yesterday, James Corner from Field Operations (the landscape architecture firm heading up the High Line's design team) revealed plans for the firm's newest commission: Shelby Farms Park in Memphis, the 4,500-acre site that will be America's largest urban park. (Central Park, by comparison, is 843 acres.)

Author: 
Patrick Hazari

In some ways, Chelsea in 1986 in not so different from what it is today. Sure, the neighborhood has changed and evolved in many ways, but it has also remained a diverse community of people, activities, and uses. The preservation and reuse of High Line adds another interesting element to the rich history of Chelsea and when Section 1 of the High Line opens later this year, the neighborhood will evolve yet again. Photos courtesy Department of City Planning.

Author: 
Anonymous
Enlargehoney
  This 4-inch praying mantis was spotted on the Rail Yards section, above 30th Street.
Author: 
matthewatthehighline

For the very first time that we are aware of, the High Line was featured in a New York Times Editorial. In it, America's paper of record challenges the City and Tishman Speyer to seize the opportunity provided by the development rights to the West Side Rail Yards and to do the right thing and "preserve all of the High Line, the 1.5-mile stretch of elevated railway that is being transformed into a green jewel of public space."

There was considerable pride and a few tears as we read this unprecedented shout-out by the Times.

Read the editorial  on the Times site, or after the jump.


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