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Please note: PLEASE NOTE: The High Line's northernmost section—from 30th Street and 11th Avenue to 34th Street between 11th Avenue and 12th Avenue — will be temporarily closed from Monday, August 17 through Monday, September 21, for some maintenance work on the Interim Walkway. The rest of the park will remain open from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily. Learn more

The High Line Blog

  • Elevated Eats: La Newyorkina

    Seasoned High Line Food vendor, La Newyorkina has been sharing their delicious Mexican popsicles, called paletas, with our visitors for years. We are huge fans of these refreshing confections and are very excited to follow founder and chef, Fany Gerson, around for this edition of Elevated Eats.We... read more
  • Photo of the Week: Four Seasons in the Forest

    The High Line's Chelsea Thicket in summer. Photo by Juan Valentin Walking through the Chelsea Thicket, on the High Line between West 21 st and West 22nd Streets, is one of the closest experiences you'll have to being in a forest in the middle of Manhattan. This short stretch features... read more
  • Flashback Friday: Westbeth Building, Then & Now

    Photo by Juan Valentin If you've walked to the High Line's southernmost tip, you've likely noticed the abrupt – yet visually captivating – way the park ends. Long ago, during the years that freight trains still chugged along these elevated tracks, the High Line cut a straight path all the ... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Cardinal Flower

    The High Line's planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, d... read more
  • Zaha Hadid-Designed Construction Shed Provides a Unique Way to Shield Park Visitors from Construction

    High Line visitors walk underneath a shed designed by architect Zaha Hadid. Photo by Scott Lynch.Visitors walking on the High line will notice a truly unusual new structure in the park: a specially designed construction shed that covers the High Line near West 28th Street. The shed was created by... read more
  • Gardening in the Sky: Removing Noxious Weeds and Protecting Our Ecosystem

    The self-seeded landscape that runs above the High Line at the Rail Yards gives visitors a chance to see what the High Line looked like before it became a park. During the structure's years of disuse, an assortment of wild plants took hold in the gravel ballast. In the Western Rail Yards section ... read more
  • Photo of the Week: Walking the High Line with Joel Sternfeld

    A Railroad Artifact, 30th Street, May 2000. Photo by Joel Sternfeld, courtesy of Luhring Augustine New York Today, on World Photo Day, we are reminded of the power of photography, both for the world at large and for our organization. From Friends of the High Line's inception, to present day when ... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Rattlesnake Master

    The High Line's planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, d... read more
  • Photo(s) of the Week: The High Line, Then and Now

    What a difference time makes! Walking the High Line today, it's difficult to imagine the space without its tended gardens and innovative design that attracts millions to the destination each year. But only a few short years ago, the elevated park was fully unrestrained in its natural beauty, pole... read more
  • Playing with Purpose: SANDBOX at The collectivity project

    Photos by Stephanie WilkinsLooking to have an art-filled August? SANDBOX, a series of workshops examining the intersection of urban space, architecture, and collective design that operates within the LEGO© landscape of Olafur Eliasson's The collectivity project, is already well underway. Over the... read more